Amman travel guide

Amman Tourism | Amman Guide

You're Going to Love Amman

Amman is the capital of Jordan and has a population of more than four million. This city of white stone sits on a steep hill and combines modern neighborhoods with ancient souks. It is a city of contrasts, with sophisticated terrace cafes, gleaming malls, and narrow, winding alleys.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Amman

1. Roman Ruins

The Roman Theater, Nymphaeum, and the Temple of Hercules are all outstanding examples of Roman-era construction.

2. Cultural Delights

The Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts and the Jordan Museum have some of the best collections in the Middle East.

3. All the King's Cars

The Royal Automobile Museum in King Hussein Park houses the impressive car collection of the late monarch.

4. Watch the Sun Go Down

Climb to the Citadel and enjoy spectacular sunsets as the muezzin call echoes across the city.

5. The Nightlife

Amman has a hopping nightlife scene, perhaps only just behind Tel Aviv and Beirut in the Middle East. Modern West Amman is the place to head for clubs, bars, and cafes.

What to do in Amman

1. Amman Citadel: An Amazing Viewpoint

The Amman Citadel sits atop the highest hill in the city, Jebel al-Qala'a, which rises to around 2,800 feet above sea level. This is the site of the ancient settlement of Rabbath-Ammon. It has been occupied since the Bronze Age and has seen occupation by the Romans and Byzantine empire among others in its long history. Indeed, it is thought to be one of the oldest continuously settled sites in the world. The area is rich with archaeological ruins and is home to the Ummayad Palace. Dating from AD 720, it was briefly home to the rulers of Amman but was destroyed by an earthquake in AD 749. The area also holds the ruins of the Temple of Hercules and the National Archaeological Museum.

2. Roman Amphitheatre: Catch a Concert

The beautifully restored Roman Amphitheatre is the most impressive reminder of the Roman city of Philadelphia, which once occupied this site. The amphitheatre sits 6,000 and still hosts concerts today. It's cut into an adjacent hillside and dates from the second century AD. It also offers some of the best views of the city, especially early in the morning. Check if there is a performance during your visit -- it's an unforgettable experience.

3. Temple of Hercules: See the Impressive Ruins

The Temple of Hercules dates from around 160 AD during the reign of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. Today, all that remains are two huge stone pillars, which were re-erected in 1993, topped by part of the podium. There is also a huge marble hand, which is thought to been part of a destroyed statue of Hercules. The temple can be seen from all over the city and it is particularly atmospheric when visited at sunset as the locals are called to prayer in the city below. It's a great time for a photograph or just to admire the view.

4. Jordan Archaeological Museum: Follow the line of History

The Jordan Archaeological Museum is located on the Amman Citadel. It contains exhibits from prehistoric times all the way through to the 15th century. The exhibits are arranged chronologically, which makes it easy to understand the history in front of you. The collections include everyday domestic objects such as pottery along with jewelry and coins. A visit to the museum is a great way to learn about the fabulous ruins that surround you on the Citadel.

5. Royal Automobile Museum: And Now For Something Different...

The Royal Automobile Museum in King Hussein Park is a rather unusual attraction in Amman. It houses the private vehicle collection of the late King Hussein and commemorates his love of automobiles. The collection includes cars and motorcycles dating from the very earliest cars of 1886 up to the 1940s. There are some rare and unusual cars and the collection is a real treat for car lovers and those who want a peek into how the royal family lived and traveled. The exhibits are accompanied by lots of fascinating information, including the stories behind each of the vehicles.

1. Amman Citadel: An Amazing Viewpoint

The Amman Citadel sits atop the highest hill in the city, Jebel al-Qala'a, which rises to around 2,800 feet above sea level. This is the site of the ancient settlement of Rabbath-Ammon. It has been occupied since the Bronze Age and has seen occupation by the Romans and Byzantine empire among others in its long history. Indeed, it is thought to be one of the oldest continuously settled sites in the world. The area is rich with archaeological ruins and is home to the Ummayad Palace. Dating from AD 720, it was briefly home to the rulers of Amman but was destroyed by an earthquake in AD 749. The area also holds the ruins of the Temple of Hercules and the National Archaeological Museum.

2. Roman Amphitheatre: Catch a Concert

The beautifully restored Roman Amphitheatre is the most impressive reminder of the Roman city of Philadelphia, which once occupied this site. The amphitheatre sits 6,000 and still hosts concerts today. It's cut into an adjacent hillside and dates from the second century AD. It also offers some of the best views of the city, especially early in the morning. Check if there is a performance during your visit -- it's an unforgettable experience.

3. Temple of Hercules: See the Impressive Ruins

The Temple of Hercules dates from around 160 AD during the reign of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. Today, all that remains are two huge stone pillars, which were re-erected in 1993, topped by part of the podium. There is also a huge marble hand, which is thought to been part of a destroyed statue of Hercules. The temple can be seen from all over the city and it is particularly atmospheric when visited at sunset as the locals are called to prayer in the city below. It's a great time for a photograph or just to admire the view.

4. Jordan Archaeological Museum: Follow the line of History

The Jordan Archaeological Museum is located on the Amman Citadel. It contains exhibits from prehistoric times all the way through to the 15th century. The exhibits are arranged chronologically, which makes it easy to understand the history in front of you. The collections include everyday domestic objects such as pottery along with jewelry and coins. A visit to the museum is a great way to learn about the fabulous ruins that surround you on the Citadel.

5. Royal Automobile Museum: And Now For Something Different...

The Royal Automobile Museum in King Hussein Park is a rather unusual attraction in Amman. It houses the private vehicle collection of the late King Hussein and commemorates his love of automobiles. The collection includes cars and motorcycles dating from the very earliest cars of 1886 up to the 1940s. There are some rare and unusual cars and the collection is a real treat for car lovers and those who want a peek into how the royal family lived and traveled. The exhibits are accompanied by lots of fascinating information, including the stories behind each of the vehicles.

Top activities & attractions in Amman

Where to Eat in Amman

Hashem in the downtown area is favored by the royal family and offers falafel, fuul, and humus dishes from JOD1.50. Levant in Jabal Amman serves gourmet Arabic dishes from JOD10.

When to visit Amman

Amman in January
Estimated hotel price
$145
1 night at 3-star hotel
Amman in January
Estimated hotel price
$145
1 night at 3-star hotel

Amman can get hot in summer and cold in winter. March through May is warm and benefits from lush vegetation and blooming wildflowers.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Fahrenheit (°F)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Amman

Plane

The city is served by Queen Alia International Airport (AMM), which has many international and regional connections. A taxi into the city center will cost around JOD20, and the bus is JOD3.25.

Car

Jordan is a compact country with a good road network. Route 65 runs north to south through the city and routes 10 and 30 connect Amman with east and west. Road signs are in both Arabic and Roman script.

Bus

Amman's two main bus stations are Tabarbour and JETT. Buses from the Israeli border arrive here, taking an hour and costing JOD7.5. A bus from Petra costs JOD9.5.

Airports near Amman

Airlines serving Amman

Lufthansa
Good (2,965 reviews)
British Airways
Good (2,120 reviews)
SWISS
Good (642 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (1,733 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (3,622 reviews)
Iberia
Good (1,186 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (1,698 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (321 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (1,454 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (2,640 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (791 reviews)
Finnair
Good (863 reviews)
Ryanair
Good (2,531 reviews)
JetBlue
Good (1,458 reviews)
LOT
Good (486 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (445 reviews)
Ethiopian Air
Good (223 reviews)
ITA Airways
Good (309 reviews)
Cathay Pacific
Good (217 reviews)
Malaysia Airlines
Good (104 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Amman

Al Balad - Al Balad is Amman's old town, with a maze of narrow streets and markets selling spice and clothing. It is also home to the Roman Theater and Citadel.

Popular Neighborhoods in Amman

Abdali - this district has been developed into a modern center of restaurants, hotels, offices, and shops.

Sweifieh - Sweifieh is centered on Wakalat Street, a pedestrianized street with shops like Gap and Zara. The cobblestone street of Shari Al-Rainbow is also nearby, with lots of cafes and sheesha tea shops.

Where to stay in popular areas of Amman

Most booked hotels in Amman

W Amman Hotel
Excellent (8.5, 2120 reviews)
$204+
Mövenpick Hotel Amman
Excellent (8.3, 2167 reviews)
$133+
Amman Rotana
Excellent (8.2, 3398 reviews)
$169+
Le Royal Hotels & Resorts - Amman
Good (7.8, 1202 reviews)
$128+
The Boulevard Arjaan by Rotana
Good (7.6, 2615 reviews)
$155+
Amman Airport Hotel
Mediocre (3.8, 1734 reviews)
$136+

How to Get Around Amman

Public Transportation

Amman has a good, safe bus network, with a single fare costing JOD0.35.

Taxi

Yellow taxis are plentiful, cheap, and reliable. The starting fare is JOD0.25 and you will then pay JOD0.6 per mile.

Car

Driving in Amman can be a little frantic, with lots of car horns sounding and a lack of lane markings. Car rental is available from Budget and Sixt, and prices start at JOD20 per day.

The Cost of Living in Amman

Shopping Streets

Abdali Boulevard is a modern street with lots of fashion shopping and Wakalat Street is a good pedestrian shopping street with international brand shops.

Groceries and Other

A quart of milk in Amman costs JOD1.20 and a loaf of bread is JOD0.26.

Cheap meal
$7.05
A pair of jeans
$70.74
Single public transport ticket
$0.71
Cappuccino
$4.27