Chania travel guide

Chania Tourism | Chania Guide

You're Going to Love Chania

Chania is a Cretan gem. This coastal town at the west end of the island retains Turkish and Venetian influences, has some spectacular natural sights as well as beaches nearby and has enough restaurants and nightlife to keep anyone happy.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Chania

1. Fascinating Historical Sights

Chania was Turkish and Venetian before it became Greek and the city has an array of historical sights, from the atmospheric harbor and the Venetian Church of Agios Nikolaos to the ramparts of Firkas Fortress.

2. Engaging Museums

Chania's long history has been presented in a cluster of great museums, including an excellent Archaeological Museum and the unique Cretan House Folklore Museum.

3. The Samaria Gorge

Not far from Chania, the Samaria Gorge cuts through southern Crete and is simply stunning. It's one of the most breath-taking hiking spots in Europe.

4. Ancient Minoan History

Well before the Venetians or Turks arrived, the Minoans ruled Crete and you can get a great sense of their achievements at the site of ancient Kydonia or on a tour of the Minoan ship in Chania harbor.

5. Stunning Beaches

If the heat is too much, you can always get away to a nearby beach. Standouts include Elafonissi, with its emerald waters, and Platanias, not far from the city.

1. Fascinating Historical Sights

Chania was Turkish and Venetian before it became Greek and the city has an array of historical sights, from the atmospheric harbor and the Venetian Church of Agios Nikolaos to the ramparts of Firkas Fortress.

2. Engaging Museums

Chania's long history has been presented in a cluster of great museums, including an excellent Archaeological Museum and the unique Cretan House Folklore Museum.

3. The Samaria Gorge

Not far from Chania, the Samaria Gorge cuts through southern Crete and is simply stunning. It's one of the most breath-taking hiking spots in Europe.

4. Ancient Minoan History

Well before the Venetians or Turks arrived, the Minoans ruled Crete and you can get a great sense of their achievements at the site of ancient Kydonia or on a tour of the Minoan ship in Chania harbor.

5. Stunning Beaches

If the heat is too much, you can always get away to a nearby beach. Standouts include Elafonissi, with its emerald waters, and Platanias, not far from the city.

What to do in Chania

1. Nautical Museum of Crete: A Must-See Tribute to the Sea

From Minoan times to Venetian rule to the Second World War, Chania's history has been impossible to separate from the Mediterranean Sea, and this museum is the perfect way to get a handle on that key relationship. See beautifully reconstructed models of ancient triremes, as well as a detailed model of the Venetian Port at the height of its glory, and don't miss the large exhibit documenting Germany's invasion of Crete in 1941. Try to get to the Moro Shipyard too, where the Museum has installed an amazing model of a Minoan ship made by local craftsmen.

2. Venetian Port: A Beautiful Seafront Neighborhood

Between 1250 and 1650, Chania was ruled by the city of Venice as part of its oceanic Empire, and the legacy of that era is the city's beautiful port district. Highlights include the Firkas Fortress, built to ward off Turkish invasion (unsuccessfully) and Angelou Street - a beautiful series of Venetian-style homes in the Topanas neighborhood. When you've absorbed the sights, the quay is lined with bakeries and tavernas where you can dine by the ocean - an ideal way to end the day.

3. Archaeological Museum of Chania: An Enchanting Ancient Exhibition

Just south of the Venetian Port, you'll find the Archaeological Museum of Chania, and you'll be glad that you did. Located in what used to be a monastery, the museum shows off some of the most impressive finds from ancient Chania, including royal seals from 5,000 years ago, gracefully sculpted bird-shaped pottery vessels and a dazzling Roman mosaic - but there are so many striking artifacts that everyone will have their own personal highlights.

4. Botanic Park & Gardens of Crete: A Phoenix from the Flames

About 10 miles south of Chania, something amazing has blossomed in the hills of the Cretan interior. After a wildfire in 2004, locals in Skordalou made a creative decision to turn what used to be thriving centuries-old olive groves into a botanical tourist attraction. Now, their efforts are (literally) bearing fruit, with orange and cherry groves, gardens laced with the aroma of lemon trees and Mediterranean herbs, and a thriving population of wild birds, farm animals, and butterflies to explore. It's an amazing comeback and an inspiring place to visit.

5. Chania Lighthouse: The Place to Enjoy Stunning Harbor Views

Located on the mole poking out into Chania harbor, the lighthouse is unmissable from the Venetian Port. Originally, the Venetians built the lighthouse as a defensive measure, enabling them to stretch a chain across the harbor entrance, but it fell into decay in the 1700s. However, thankfully, the Ottomans rebuilt the tower and renovations in 2005 have left it looking more elegant than ever. You can't climb the lighthouse, but the views from the promontory offer some of Chania's most beautiful views, so it's a must-visit attraction.

Nautical Museum of CreteNautical Museum of Crete
Venetian PortVenetian Port

1. Nautical Museum of Crete: A Must-See Tribute to the Sea

From Minoan times to Venetian rule to the Second World War, Chania's history has been impossible to separate from the Mediterranean Sea, and this museum is the perfect way to get a handle on that key relationship. See beautifully reconstructed models of ancient triremes, as well as a detailed model of the Venetian Port at the height of its glory, and don't miss the large exhibit documenting Germany's invasion of Crete in 1941. Try to get to the Moro Shipyard too, where the Museum has installed an amazing model of a Minoan ship made by local craftsmen.

2. Venetian Port: A Beautiful Seafront Neighborhood

Between 1250 and 1650, Chania was ruled by the city of Venice as part of its oceanic Empire, and the legacy of that era is the city's beautiful port district. Highlights include the Firkas Fortress, built to ward off Turkish invasion (unsuccessfully) and Angelou Street - a beautiful series of Venetian-style homes in the Topanas neighborhood. When you've absorbed the sights, the quay is lined with bakeries and tavernas where you can dine by the ocean - an ideal way to end the day.

3. Archaeological Museum of Chania: An Enchanting Ancient Exhibition

Just south of the Venetian Port, you'll find the Archaeological Museum of Chania, and you'll be glad that you did. Located in what used to be a monastery, the museum shows off some of the most impressive finds from ancient Chania, including royal seals from 5,000 years ago, gracefully sculpted bird-shaped pottery vessels and a dazzling Roman mosaic - but there are so many striking artifacts that everyone will have their own personal highlights.

4. Botanic Park & Gardens of Crete: A Phoenix from the Flames

About 10 miles south of Chania, something amazing has blossomed in the hills of the Cretan interior. After a wildfire in 2004, locals in Skordalou made a creative decision to turn what used to be thriving centuries-old olive groves into a botanical tourist attraction. Now, their efforts are (literally) bearing fruit, with orange and cherry groves, gardens laced with the aroma of lemon trees and Mediterranean herbs, and a thriving population of wild birds, farm animals, and butterflies to explore. It's an amazing comeback and an inspiring place to visit.

5. Chania Lighthouse: The Place to Enjoy Stunning Harbor Views

Located on the mole poking out into Chania harbor, the lighthouse is unmissable from the Venetian Port. Originally, the Venetians built the lighthouse as a defensive measure, enabling them to stretch a chain across the harbor entrance, but it fell into decay in the 1700s. However, thankfully, the Ottomans rebuilt the tower and renovations in 2005 have left it looking more elegant than ever. You can't climb the lighthouse, but the views from the promontory offer some of Chania's most beautiful views, so it's a must-visit attraction.

Nautical Museum of CreteNautical Museum of Crete
Venetian PortVenetian Port

1. Nautical Museum of Crete: A Must-See Tribute to the Sea

From Minoan times to Venetian rule to the Second World War, Chania's history has been impossible to separate from the Mediterranean Sea, and this museum is the perfect way to get a handle on that key relationship. See beautifully reconstructed models of ancient triremes, as well as a detailed model of the Venetian Port at the height of its glory, and don't miss the large exhibit documenting Germany's invasion of Crete in 1941. Try to get to the Moro Shipyard too, where the Museum has installed an amazing model of a Minoan ship made by local craftsmen.

Nautical Museum of Crete

2. Venetian Port: A Beautiful Seafront Neighborhood

Between 1250 and 1650, Chania was ruled by the city of Venice as part of its oceanic Empire, and the legacy of that era is the city's beautiful port district. Highlights include the Firkas Fortress, built to ward off Turkish invasion (unsuccessfully) and Angelou Street - a beautiful series of Venetian-style homes in the Topanas neighborhood. When you've absorbed the sights, the quay is lined with bakeries and tavernas where you can dine by the ocean - an ideal way to end the day.

Venetian Port

3. Archaeological Museum of Chania: An Enchanting Ancient Exhibition

Just south of the Venetian Port, you'll find the Archaeological Museum of Chania, and you'll be glad that you did. Located in what used to be a monastery, the museum shows off some of the most impressive finds from ancient Chania, including royal seals from 5,000 years ago, gracefully sculpted bird-shaped pottery vessels and a dazzling Roman mosaic - but there are so many striking artifacts that everyone will have their own personal highlights.

4. Botanic Park & Gardens of Crete: A Phoenix from the Flames

About 10 miles south of Chania, something amazing has blossomed in the hills of the Cretan interior. After a wildfire in 2004, locals in Skordalou made a creative decision to turn what used to be thriving centuries-old olive groves into a botanical tourist attraction. Now, their efforts are (literally) bearing fruit, with orange and cherry groves, gardens laced with the aroma of lemon trees and Mediterranean herbs, and a thriving population of wild birds, farm animals, and butterflies to explore. It's an amazing comeback and an inspiring place to visit.

5. Chania Lighthouse: The Place to Enjoy Stunning Harbor Views

Located on the mole poking out into Chania harbor, the lighthouse is unmissable from the Venetian Port. Originally, the Venetians built the lighthouse as a defensive measure, enabling them to stretch a chain across the harbor entrance, but it fell into decay in the 1700s. However, thankfully, the Ottomans rebuilt the tower and renovations in 2005 have left it looking more elegant than ever. You can't climb the lighthouse, but the views from the promontory offer some of Chania's most beautiful views, so it's a must-visit attraction.

Activities & attractions in Chania

Where to Eat in Chania

Some of the best tavernas in Chania - and there are plenty - include Chalkina by the harbor, Prassein Aloga (which also hosts live music most nights), and the slightly remote but superb Thalassino Ageri, where fish is the specialty. Prices vary, but a meal will typically cost around EUR15.

When to visit Chania

Chania in February
Estimated hotel price
$85
1 night at 3-star hotel
Chania in February
Estimated hotel price
$85
1 night at 3-star hotel

Summer is a good time for beach lovers and the Chania Cultural Festival takes place in August. If you can't stand 100+ degree heat, try October or between April and early June.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Chania

Plane

Daily flights from Athens touch down at Chania International Airport, as do seasonal flights from the UK. Airport buses cost EUR2.30 and take around 20 minutes.

Car

Those driving from Heraklion need to take the E75 along the coast to Chania, while the E65 runs from Kissamos to the west.

Bus

KTEL operates daily buses from Cretan cities like Rethimno and Heraklion. The bus from Heraklion takes 3 hours and costs around EUR15.

Plane

Daily flights from Athens touch down at Chania International Airport, as do seasonal flights from the UK. Airport buses cost EUR2.30 and take around 20 minutes.

Car

Those driving from Heraklion need to take the E75 along the coast to Chania, while the E65 runs from Kissamos to the west.

Bus

KTEL operates daily buses from Cretan cities like Rethimno and Heraklion. The bus from Heraklion takes 3 hours and costs around EUR15.

Airports near Chania

Airlines serving Chania

Lufthansa
Good (4,701 reviews)
SWISS
Good (961 reviews)
British Airways
Good (4,680 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (482 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (2,112 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (228 reviews)
Finnair
Good (840 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (791 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (5,823 reviews)
Eurowings
Good (190 reviews)
Norwegian
Good (145 reviews)
Air Serbia
Good (137 reviews)
easyJet
Good (1,425 reviews)
Ryanair
Good (3,397 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (5,746 reviews)
Transavia France
Good (240 reviews)
Aegean Airlines
Excellent (506 reviews)
Luxair
Excellent (40 reviews)
Smartwings
Excellent (10 reviews)
Transavia
Good (78 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Chania

High-quality resort hotels near Chania include the Grecotel Kalliston and Cretan Dream Royal Hotel, while good options in town include Casa Delfino and the Ambassadors Residence.

Popular Neighborhoods in Chania

The Old Town - Around in some form since 3,600 BC, Chania is certainly old. The Old Town is a beautiful neighborhood filled with alleys, lanes and endless tavernas.

Splantzia - Known as the Turkish neighborhood, Splantzia is full of Ottoman mosques and fountains.

Ovriaki - Once the city's Jewish neighborhood, Ovriaki is a bustling commercial center, particularly around Kondilaki Street.

The Old Town - Around in some form since 3,600 BC, Chania is certainly old. The Old Town is a beautiful neighborhood filled with alleys, lanes and endless tavernas.
Splantzia - Known as the Turkish neighborhood, Splantzia is full of Ottoman mosques and fountains.
Ovriaki - Once the city's Jewish neighborhood, Ovriaki is a bustling commercial center, particularly around Kondilaki Street.

Where to stay in popular areas of Chania

Most booked hotels in Chania

Domes Noruz Chania, Autograph Collection- Adults Only
5 stars
Excellent (9.4, 228 reviews)
$519+
Casa Delfino Hotel & Spa
5 stars
Excellent (9.3, 475 reviews)
$231+
Cretan Dream Resort & Spa
4 stars
Excellent (9.2, 598 reviews)
$196+
Royal Sun
3 stars
Excellent (9, 2330 reviews)
$91+
Isla Brown Chania Resort, Curio Collection by Hilton
5 stars
Excellent (8.9, 269 reviews)
$206+
Avra Imperial Hotel
5 stars
Excellent (8.8, 463 reviews)
$294+

How to Get Around Chania

Public Transportation

Chania Urban Buses runs a local bus network. Single tickets cost just EUR1.20 and fares are paid when you board.

Taxi

Expect taxis in Chania to charge around EUR3 for the first mile, then EUR1.50 or so for every mile after that.

Car

You can rent a car of your own from the local branches Avis and Flisvos. Daily rates should be around EUR10-15.

Public Transportation

Chania Urban Buses runs a local bus network. Single tickets cost just EUR1.20 and fares are paid when you board.

Taxi

Expect taxis in Chania to charge around EUR3 for the first mile, then EUR1.50 or so for every mile after that.

Car

You can rent a car of your own from the local branches Avis and Flisvos. Daily rates should be around EUR10-15.

The Cost of Living in Chania

Shopping Streets

Kondilaki, Zambeliou and Halidon in the center of town are the main shopping streets, but check out the Agora (covered market) as well. The city is particularly famous for its leather goods, so there may be some bargain accessories to be found.

Groceries and Other

Local supermarket options include ΣΥΝ and Carrefour. Expect a gallon of milk to cost around EUR4.80.

Cheap meal
$10.00
A pair of jeans
$79.96
Single public transport ticket
$1.67
Cappuccino
$3.04
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