Anchorage travel guide

The City of Lights and Flowers

Anchorage Tourism | Anchorage Guide

You're Going to Love Anchorage

Alaska is closer than you think, and there's no better place to escape from the workaday world than Anchorage. This welcoming, walkable city has everything you could need from a tourist destination but with one big difference - it's right on the doorstep of the beautiful, mysterious Alaskan wilderness.

You can spend a whole vacation in Anchorage getting in touch with nature. Kayak to glaciers as they gently make their way out to sea, rent bikes and hit challenging trails, or just shoulder your pack and pick from hundreds of camping locations in the area.

If you love wildlife, join organized tours to see all of the area's big animals, go whale-watching or head to Anchorage Zoo. Or, you just want to relax, spend the day shopping in Downtown Anchorage before checking out superb eateries like the Crow's Nest.

With excellent plane connections to the lower 48 states, Anchorage is closer than you think, so why not make it the destination for your next getaway?

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Anchorage

Alpine Attractions

Anchorage is ringed by impressive mountains which are a key part of the city's appeal. In the summer, sites like Glen Alps become fantastic mountain biking destinations, while, when the snows arrive, ski resorts like Alyeska offer near-perfect skiing conditions.

Wonderful Seafood

Alaskan seafood is on a par with the Eastern Seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico. In Alaska's case, dishes include halibut, salmon, king crab and tuna sashimi and Anchorage is packed with restaurants in which to sample local delicacies, including Jens', the Crow's Nest and Ginnie's.

A Chance to Get Away from It All in the Wilderness

Alaska is a thousand miles away from the stresses and strains of home and it really feels like it. With thousands of square miles of unspoiled wilderness in Anchorage city limits alone, it's easy to find a secluded spot to relax and recharge your batteries.

A Lively Crafts Scene

Anchorage is also an excellent place to shop for souvenirs. If you are in town during the summer, check out the market which takes over Downtown Anchorage or shop for unique gifts like ulu knives at Downtown souvenir vendors like Polar Bear Gifts.

The Chance to See Majestic Wildlife

Alaska is one of the last wild places in America and visitors to Anchorage can easily join wildlife tours. If you do, there's a good chance of catching a glimpse of Alaska's "big five", which includes grizzlies, moose, caribou, wolves and dall sheep.

What to do in Anchorage

1. Alaska Native Heritage Center: Honor America's Diversity

Long before Alaska was inaugurated as the 49th state, the Native people of the region had a rich history and connection with this northern territory. The Alaska Native Heritage Center pays tribute to those 11 cultural groups through exhibits, storytelling, and cultural performances. Here you can learn the customs of indigenous tribes and current efforts to foster a more inclusive American narrative. There are also many opportunities to take cultural awareness classes and channel the Native people's spirit.

2. Chugach National Forest: America's Northernmost Park

Join over half a million tourists who travel to Chugach National Forest each year for some of the best outdoor sports and vistas in the entire United States. The park features a diverse landscape of glaciers, mountains, rivers, and valleys. To take full advantage of Chugach National Forest, book a local tour guide who can safely guide you to the best places for kayaking, hiking, or commercial fishing. The Prince William Sound is a well-known site for watching wild Orcas swimming amongst the backdrop of an icy, still ocean.

3. Alaska Center for the Performing Arts: Take in a Show

Anchorage may be a humble capital city, but it's also got a deep sense of community and a deep support for the arts. The Alaska Center for the Performing Arts is located just beside Town Square Park in the heart of downtown Anchorage. There are actually three different performance theaters with various capacities situated within the building: Evangeline Atwood Concert Hall, Discovery Theater, and the Sydney Laurence Theater. Visitors can enjoy both local productions as well as internationally-acclaimed artists who make regular tours through Anchorage each year.

4. Anchorage Museum: Spend a Night at the Museum

Alaska's northern position means that half the year the State is completely covered in darkness, making it the perfect time to explore the Anchorage Museum. This multi-functional space covers everything from art to ecology, history to science. Specifically, the museum covers works related to or originating from Alaska in order to promote the local arts. For an alternative experience, take in an old classic film during the museum's popular "Celluloid Wednesday" or lift off to the stars in the impressive planetarium.

5. Kenai Fjords National Park: An Outdoor Treasure-Trove

Who says you have to go all the way to Norway to see the fjords? Alaska's Kenai Fjords National Park is an absolute treasure-trove of outdoor possibilities tucked away in the southeastern part of the State. Some of the most popular activities in the park include hiking and kayaking through a mirror-like icy surface, making for some of the most astounding pictures a tourist could ask for. The area is teeming with arctic wildlife including otters, sea lions, puffins, and even whales. In addition, most cruise ships pass through this area, making it a safe place to venture into the extreme wild. There are also many smaller boat tours for those looking for a healthy mix of land and sea exploration.

Alaska Native Heritage CenterAlaska Native Heritage Center
Chugach National ForestChugach National Forest
Alaska Center for the Performing ArtsAlaska Center for the Performing Arts
Anchorage MuseumAnchorage Museum

1. Alaska Native Heritage Center: Honor America's Diversity

Long before Alaska was inaugurated as the 49th state, the Native people of the region had a rich history and connection with this northern territory. The Alaska Native Heritage Center pays tribute to those 11 cultural groups through exhibits, storytelling, and cultural performances. Here you can learn the customs of indigenous tribes and current efforts to foster a more inclusive American narrative. There are also many opportunities to take cultural awareness classes and channel the Native people's spirit.

2. Chugach National Forest: America's Northernmost Park

Join over half a million tourists who travel to Chugach National Forest each year for some of the best outdoor sports and vistas in the entire United States. The park features a diverse landscape of glaciers, mountains, rivers, and valleys. To take full advantage of Chugach National Forest, book a local tour guide who can safely guide you to the best places for kayaking, hiking, or commercial fishing. The Prince William Sound is a well-known site for watching wild Orcas swimming amongst the backdrop of an icy, still ocean.

3. Alaska Center for the Performing Arts: Take in a Show

Anchorage may be a humble capital city, but it's also got a deep sense of community and a deep support for the arts. The Alaska Center for the Performing Arts is located just beside Town Square Park in the heart of downtown Anchorage. There are actually three different performance theaters with various capacities situated within the building: Evangeline Atwood Concert Hall, Discovery Theater, and the Sydney Laurence Theater. Visitors can enjoy both local productions as well as internationally-acclaimed artists who make regular tours through Anchorage each year.

4. Anchorage Museum: Spend a Night at the Museum

Alaska's northern position means that half the year the State is completely covered in darkness, making it the perfect time to explore the Anchorage Museum. This multi-functional space covers everything from art to ecology, history to science. Specifically, the museum covers works related to or originating from Alaska in order to promote the local arts. For an alternative experience, take in an old classic film during the museum's popular "Celluloid Wednesday" or lift off to the stars in the impressive planetarium.

5. Kenai Fjords National Park: An Outdoor Treasure-Trove

Who says you have to go all the way to Norway to see the fjords? Alaska's Kenai Fjords National Park is an absolute treasure-trove of outdoor possibilities tucked away in the southeastern part of the State. Some of the most popular activities in the park include hiking and kayaking through a mirror-like icy surface, making for some of the most astounding pictures a tourist could ask for. The area is teeming with arctic wildlife including otters, sea lions, puffins, and even whales. In addition, most cruise ships pass through this area, making it a safe place to venture into the extreme wild. There are also many smaller boat tours for those looking for a healthy mix of land and sea exploration.

Alaska Native Heritage CenterAlaska Native Heritage Center
Chugach National ForestChugach National Forest
Alaska Center for the Performing ArtsAlaska Center for the Performing Arts
Anchorage MuseumAnchorage Museum

Top activities & attractions in Anchorage

Where to Eat in Anchorage

If you want to dine in authentic Alaskan style, seafood is where it's at, and Anchorage has some exceptional dining options. From elite eateries like the Crow's Nest (which has 10,000 wine bottles in its cellar) to mid-range restaurants like Simon and Seafort's or budget places like Gwennie's (where reindeer sausages are a specialty), you won't struggle to find great places to eat. Expect to pay $35 or more at high-end restaurants, but $10-15 at places like Gwennie's.

Most popular restaurants in Anchorage

American
Excellent (185 reviews)
Northwest
Excellent (151 reviews)
Contemporary American
Excellent (135 reviews)
Japanese
Excellent (131 reviews)
Seafood
Excellent (130 reviews)
American
Excellent (52 reviews)

When to visit Anchorage

Anchorage in October
Estimated package price
$419
2 travelers
Flight to Anchorage
3 nights at hotel
Anchorage in October
Estimated package price
$419
2 travelers
Flight to Anchorage
3 nights at hotel

Most visitors to Anchorage arrive during the summer months, when temperatures rise into the 60s on a regular basis, and the mountain biking trails, hiking paths and coastal attractions are at their best. However, April and May are also good times to go if you like to ski, owing to the long daylight hours. Winter probably won't appeal to many people due to the weather conditions.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Average
Fahrenheit (°F)
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Anchorage

Plane

Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport is the main entry point for visitors to Anchorage and there are daily direct flights to a number of American cities, including New York, Seattle, Chicago and Detroit. The easiest way to get from the airport to Anchorage's major hotels is via shuttle companies like Shuttleman or Eagle River Shuttle although there are car rental outlets at the airport including Avis and Hertz.

Car

If you don't fancy the flight from the lower 48 states to Alaska, there is an alternative. The Alaska Highway runs all the way up the coast of British Columbia and links Anchorage to Seattle and Portland (though leave over a day to complete the journey).

Boat

Anchorage is also a major cruise ship terminal, with firms like Princess Cruises running weekly services from Seattle and Vancouver during the summer season.

Airports near Anchorage

Airlines serving Anchorage

Lufthansa
Good (1,372 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (2,464 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (3,899 reviews)
KLM
Good (291 reviews)
Air France
Good (295 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,658 reviews)
British Airways
Good (940 reviews)
SWISS
Excellent (357 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (928 reviews)
Iberia
Good (663 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (640 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (195 reviews)
Finnair
Good (449 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Good (154 reviews)
LATAM Airlines
Good (630 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (1,938 reviews)
Aeromexico
Good (788 reviews)
Copa Airlines
Good (446 reviews)
Japan Airlines
Good (300 reviews)
Korean Air
Excellent (113 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Anchorage

Anchorage is packed with accommodation options, many of them offering luxury suites and upscale amenities. In the highest price range, check out the Hilton Downtown or the Anchorage Marriott. Slightly lower down the price scale, the Comfort Inn is affordable and conveniently located, while Jarvi Homestay offers a welcoming B&B experience and the Arctic Adventure Hostel is the best place in town to find bargain dorm beds.

Popular neighborhoods in Anchorage

Downtown Anchorage – Downtown Anchorage is a compact neighborhood built around the traditional grid system, and it's where locals go to play, shop and dine. During tourist season, the area becomes a bustling crafts and food market every weekend, with over 300 independent stalls, while you can shop for unique Alaskan gifts any day of the week at Downtown stores like Polar Bear Gifts and David Green Master Furrier.

Spenard – Once a town of its own, Spenard probably pre-dates Anchorage and retains an independent feel. Often thought of as the "rougher" side of town, it's actually more culturally vibrant, hosting "Spenardi Gras" every February and hosting most of Anchorage's liveliest music bars.

Girdwood – Girdwood is a charming resort which has been partly overtaken by the suburbs of Anchorage, but still feels separate somehow. Located in a valley, Girdwood has easy access to skiing and snowboarding pistes and is a favorite base for hikers and mountaineers during the summer. It's the ideal place to base yourself if you love the outdoors.

Most popular hotel in Anchorage by neighborhood

Where to stay in popular areas of Anchorage

Most booked hotels in Anchorage

Alaska Chalet Bed & Breakfast
Excellent (9.4, 29 reviews)
$88+
Staybridge Suites Anchorage
Excellent (8.5, 114 reviews)
$256+
Comfort Suites Anchorage International Airport
Excellent (8.3, 371 reviews)
$135+
Courtyard by Marriott Anchorage Airport
Good (7.8, 222 reviews)
$177+
Bent Prop Inn & Hostel Midtown
Poor (0, 0 reviews)
$167+
Microtel Inn & Suites By Wyndham Eagle River/Anchorage Area
Good (6.7, 199 reviews)
$53+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Anchorage

Public Transportation

Although it isn't the most efficient public transit system in the world, Anchorage's PeopleMover bus network can be useful for tourists. Single tickets cost just $2 but be aware that most routes have only a single bus every hour, so you may have to wait for a while.

Taxis

If you want to book a taxi, there are two major companies in the Anchorage area: Checker Cab and Alaska Yellow Cab. Typical rates include $2.75 for the meter drop and first mile, then $2.50 per mile after that. There is currently no Uber service in the city following a dispute with the local authority.

Car

Renting a car is essential if you plan to travel outside of the center of town and there are plenty of rental options at Ted Stevens Airport. Note that rental rates spike during high summer and can reach over $100 a day, but plummet slightly out of season, so look closely for bargain deals. If you happen to drive in Anchorage during the winter months, snow is likely, so only rent a vehicle if you are confident about driving in icy conditions.

The Cost of Living in Anchorage

Shopping Streets

If you visit during the summer, Downtown is the place to shop. Craft vendors, farmers and artisan food makers from the region come together every weekend to take over the Downtown grid, and it's a great place to find special souvenirs for folks back home. Anchorage also has several conventional malls. The biggest and most upscale is probably 5th Avenue Mall, where you'll find brands like Sak's and JC Penney's. Dimond Center Mall is also worth a visit, if only for the range of entertainment options, including a cinema, bowling alley and ice rink.

Groceries and Other

Aside from the farmers market in Downtown Anchorage, the city has plenty of supermarkets, which is particularly handy for self-catering visitors. There's a Walmart Supercenter on A Street, a Hana Supermarket and a branch of Fred Meyer's, so finding places to buy groceries isn't an issue. However, Anchorage isn't cheap. A gallon of milk will cost over $4 and a pound of apples more than $2.30, so budget accordingly.

Cheap meal
$15.00
A pair of jeans
$42.88
Single public transport ticket
$2.00
Cappuccino
$4.20
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